Earn Money By Clicking

LightBlog

Breaking

Sunday, June 16, 2019

June 16, 2019

Store shooting took place after man hit officer: Police

CORONA: An off-duty police officer opened fire inside a Costco Wholesale warehouse store, killing a man who had attacked him and wounding two others, the Corona Police Department said.

Kenneth French (32) of Riverside assaulted the Los Angeles Police Department officer Friday night while he was holding his young child, the department said in a statement Saturday. The officer fired his gun, hitting French and two of French’s relatives, the department said.

French was killed, the department said. The relatives are in critical conditions at hospitals.

The officer, whose identity is being withheld, was treated and released at a nearby hospital, and the officer’s child was not injured, the department said.

The officer was the only person who fired shots in the store, the department said.

The shooting prompted a stampede of frightened shoppers to flee the store east of Los Angeles and seek cover inside.

Witnesses said they saw a man with a Mohawk haircut arguing with someone near a freezer section when shots rang out at least six times. The man involved in the argument was killed, Corona police Lieutenant Jeff Edwards said.

Witnesses said there was an altercation. Shoppers and employees described terror and chaos when shots rang out shortly before 8 pm Friday and police swarmed the store.

Shrieks from inside the store were heard on video recorded by shopper Nikki Tate, who had stopped by with her daughter to pick up steaks and lobsters for Father’s Day.

Tate said Saturday she was by the meat section when she heard “about six or seven shots.” She dropped to the ground and crawled toward her daughter who was at the other end. They huddled until they were able to escape through a side door.

“I saw people and heard shots and my first though was ‘Jesus, is this another mass shooting?'” she said. “I didn’t know if this was a random thing or a domestic thing or if this was a mass shooting. Everything was happening so fast, I just wanted to get me and my kid to safety.”

In the video, her daughter says, “Mommy, we need to go.”

The Los Angeles Police Department said in a statement Saturday afternoon that it has launched its own investigation of the incident.

Christina Colis told the Riverside Press-Enterprise that she was in the produce area when she heard six to seven shots and hid with other shoppers in a refrigerated produce room. She said her mother saw people injured on the floor.

“I thought maybe someone dropped a bottle of wine, but then I kept hearing shots,” shopper Will Lungo told the Press-Enterprise newspaper. “An employee came in and helped us out through the emergency exit.”

Witnesses told KCAL-TV that shoppers and employees rushed to the exits. The station reported that more than 100 people were outside the store at one point. Left behind inside the store were purses, cellphones and backpacks from panicked shoppers, Corona police said.

The post Store shooting took place after man hit officer: Police appeared first on The Himalayan Times.



from World – The Himalayan Times http://bit.ly/2KUUPAn
June 16, 2019

ISPs roll back decision to hike fees

Kathmandu, June 15

The Internet Service Providers Association of Nepal (ISPAN) has said it will pull back its earlier decision to hike internet service price.

The announcement comes after the government decided to waive Telecommunication Service Charge (TSC) on internet wires and routers, leased line data connectivity and repair costs.

The government through the budget speech for next fiscal year 2019-20 had announced to hike the taxes on internet service providers. As a result, ISPs had also announced a hike of 20 per cent on internet service fee effective from the next fiscal.

According to Bhoj Raj Bhatta, chairman of ISPAN, the government has agreed not to introduce the tax that it had earlier announced. “The decision will not be implemented for the time being.”

Earlier in the budget announcement, the government had made it mandatory for internet service providers to pay 13 per cent value added tax and 13 per cent Telecommunication Service Charge from next fiscal year.

Till fiscal year 2017-18, the government used to charge only 11 per cent tax on the service providers. But from ongoing fiscal year, the government had decided to increase the TSC from 11 per cent to 13 per cent, following which the ISPs decided to increase the service charge for customers.

But the government and ISPs later reached an agreement not to hike internet prices for the consumers.

The post ISPs roll back decision to hike fees appeared first on The Himalayan Times.



from Business – The Himalayan Times http://bit.ly/31DQ8AS
June 16, 2019

Saudi seeks oil supply protection as the US and Iran face off

  • Six tankers attacked in space of a month
  • Trumps says US video shows Iran “did it”
  • Tehran denies role in May or June attacks
  • Tensions high since the US quit nuclear pact
  • Britain also blames Iran, others urge caution

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia called for swift action to secure Gulf energy supplies and joined the United States in blaming Iran for attacks on two oil tankers in a vital shipping route that have raised fears of broader confrontation in the region.

Thursday’s tanker attacks in the Gulf of Oman exacerbated the antagonistic fallout from similar blasts in May that crippled four vessels. Washington, already embroiled in a standoff with Iran over its nuclear programme, has blamed Tehran and Saudi Arabia’s crown prince also accused Iran on Saturday.

Iran has denied any role in the strikes on the tankers south of the Strait of Hormuz, a major transit route for oil from Saudi Arabia, the world’s biggest crude exporter, and other Gulf producers.

Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih said there must be a “rapid and decisive response to the threat” to energy supplies, market stability and consumer confidence, his ministry said on Twitter.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, in an interview with Saudi-owned newspaper Asharq Al-Awsat, blamed Iran and called on the international community to take a “decisive stand” against the attacks.

“The kingdom does not want a war in the region but it will not hesitate to deal with any threats to its people, its sovereignty, or its vital interests,” the crown prince said.

The US military released a video on Thursday that it said showed Iran’s Revolutionary Guards were behind the explosions that damaged the Norwegian-owned Front Altair and the Japanese-owned Kokuka Courageous.

“Iran did do it and you know they did it because you saw the boat,” US President Donald Trump told Fox News on Friday.

The United States has tightened sanctions on Iran since Washington withdrew from a 2015 nuclear pact between Tehran and global powers last year. Washington’s stated aim is to drive Iranian oil exports, the mainstay of its economy, to zero.

Tehran has said that if its oil exports were halted, it could block the Strait of Hormuz, a narrow channel of water separating Iran and Oman through which passes a fifth of the oil consumed globally.

ENERGY SECURITY

Oil prices have climbed 3.4% since Thursday’s attacks. Ship insurers said insurance costs for ships sailing through the Middle East have jumped by at least 10%.

Saudi Arabia’s energy minister said in Japan at a meeting of energy ministers from the G20 group of nations that the kingdom is committed to ensuring the stability of global oil markets.

Japanese Industry Minister Hiroshige Seko said ministers agreed on the need to “work together to deal with the recent incidents from (an) energy security point of view.”

Trump, who pulled the United States out of the nuclear deal under which world powers agreed to ease international sanctions on Iran in return for curbs on Tehran’s nuclear work, said any move to close the Strait of Hormuz would not last long.

He also said he was open to holding talks with Iran, although Tehran said it had no plans to negotiate with the United States unless it reversed a decision on the nuclear deal.

Tehran and Washington have both said they have no interest in a war. But this has done little to assuage concerns that the arch foes could stumble into conflict.

A US official told Reuters a surface-to-air missile was fired from Iranian territory on Thursday morning at a US drone that was near Front Altair following the attack on the tanker. The missile did not hit the drone, the official said.

Acting US Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said the United States was “planning various contingencies” when asked if more military forces would be sent to the area, but added that the focus was on building an international consensus.

“We also need to broaden our support for this international situation,” he told reporters on Friday.

CALLS FOR RESTRAINT

As well as blaming Iran for the tanker attacks, Washington has said Tehran was behind May 14 drone strikes on two Saudi oil-pumping stations. Tehran has denied all those charges.

Britain has backed the United States in blaming Iran for the tanker attacks. On Saturday, Iran summoned the British ambassador to complain about its “unacceptable stance,” ISNA news agency reported.

Other nations have urged caution. Germany said the video released by the US military was not enough to prove Iran’s role, while UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called for an independent investigation to determine responsibility.

China and the European Union called for restraint.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani renewed Iran’s threat to continue scaling back compliance with the nuclear deal unless other signatories to the pact show “positive signals”.

He did not specify what Iran wanted in his comments to a meeting of Asian leaders in Tajikistan.

France and other European signatories to the nuclear deal have said they wanted to save the accord. But many of their companies have cancelled deals with Tehran, under pressure from the United States.

The post Saudi seeks oil supply protection as the US and Iran face off appeared first on The Himalayan Times.



from World – The Himalayan Times http://bit.ly/2XiGLHC
June 16, 2019

NATTA signs MoU with NCHL

KATHMANDU: Nepal Association of Tour and Travel Agents (NATTA) and Nepal Clearing House Ltd (NCHL) have signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) for automating the former’s payment processes directly through bank accounts.

The MoU was signed by CN Pandey, president of NATTA and Neelesh Man Singh Pradhan, CEO of NCHL, as per a media release. As per the MoU, the systems of the member agents of NATTA will be integrated with NCHL’s payment systems, namely NCHL-IPS and connectIPS e-Payment systems through which all the payment transactions will be processed.

With this, the transactions related to their disbursements and payments will be automatically credited into the respective beneficiary accounts held at any of the 76 banks and financial institutions (BFIs).

Similarly, customers can make online payments regarding the various tour packages or travel tickets purchased by them through connectIPS or from the branches of any of the BFIs.

This partnership between NATTA and NCHL will largely facilitate the numerous travel and tour agents of the country by providing them a digital platform for processing their transactions directly from bank accounts and customers will also equally benefit from this service.

The post NATTA signs MoU with NCHL appeared first on The Himalayan Times.



from Business – The Himalayan Times http://bit.ly/2WNosuP
June 16, 2019

Strong quake hits island chain off New Zealand; no tsunami

WELLINGTON: A magnitude 7.4 earthquake struck an arc of islands off New Zealand on Sunday, and the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said it may cause only minor sea level changes in some coastal areas.

The US Geological Survey said the earthquake hit a spot about 873 kilometres (541 miles) northeast of Ngunguru, New Zealand, a town of about 1,400 people. It occurred at a depth of 10 kilometres (6 miles).

The area the quake struck is called the Kermadec Islands, about 800 kilometers (497 miles) northeast of New Zealand’s North Island.

New Zealand’s Ministry of Civil Defense and Emergency Management cleared New Zealand of a tsunami threat moments after issuing a beach warning.

The Kermadec Islands, a volcanic archipelago, are prone to earthquakes. The islands are a dependency of New Zealand and lie at the western edge of the Kermadec Trench.

There are no permanent settlements on the islands.

The post Strong quake hits island chain off New Zealand; no tsunami appeared first on The Himalayan Times.



from World – The Himalayan Times http://bit.ly/2KXOMLL
June 16, 2019

Thousands dressed in black rally to demand Hong Kong leader steps down

  • Protesters want bill withdrawn and Lam to step down
  • Organisers hope more than a million will rally
  • The protest comes a day after extradition bill suspended

HONG KONG: Thousands of people took to the streets in Hong Kong on Sunday dressed in black to demand the city’s embattled leader steps down, a day after she suspended an extradition bill in a dramatic retreat following the most violent protests in decades.

Activists set up gazebos as protesters, some carrying white flowers, started to gather in the sweltering summer heat to march from Victoria Park to Hong Kong’s central government offices.

Hong Kong Extradition

People pay their respects at the site where a man fell from a scaffolding at the Pacific Place complex while protesting against a proposed extradition bill, in Hong Kong, China June 16, 2019. Photo: Reuters

Beijing-backed Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on Saturday indefinitely delayed the extradition bill that could send people to mainland China to face trial, expressing “deep sorrow and regret”.

The about-face was one of the most significant political turnarounds by the Hong Kong government since Britain returned the territory to China in 1997, and it threw into question Lam’s ability to continue to lead the city.

“I wasn’t going to come today, but when I saw what happened on Wednesday, Hong Kong people getting wrecked, that really hurt. So I decided to come down,” said Matt Chan who was waiting to join the protest.

Violent clashes on Wednesday when police fired rubber bullets and tear gas at protesters near the heart of the financial centre grabbed global headlines and forced some banks, including HSBC, to shut branches.

Critics say the planned extradition law could threaten Hong Kong’s rule of law and its international reputation as an Asian financial hub. Some Hong Kong tycoons have already started moving personal wealth offshore.

Activist investor David Webb, in a newsletter on Sunday, said if Lam was a stock he would recommend shorting her with a target price of zero.

“Call it the Carrie trade. She has irrevocably lost the public’s trust,” Webb said.

“Her minders in Beijing, while expressing public support, for now, have clearly lined her up for the chop by distancing themselves from the proposal in recent days.”

China’s Communist Party mouthpiece, the People’s Daily, said in a commentary on Sunday that central authorities expressed “firm support” for Lam.

Protest organisers are hoping more than a million people turn up for Sunday’s rally, scheduled to start at 2.30pm local time, similar to numbers they estimated for a demonstration against the proposed extradition bill last Sunday. Police put that count at 240,000.

The protests have plunged Hong Kong into a political crisis, just as months of pro-democracy “Occupy” demonstrations did in 2014, heaping pressure on Lam’s administration and her official backers in Beijing.

The turmoil comes at a difficult time for Beijing, which is already grappling with an escalating US trade war, a faltering economy and tensions in the South China Sea.

“EXTENSIVE MEDDLING”

The city’s independent legal system was guaranteed under laws governing Hong Kong’s return from British to Chinese rule 22 years ago and is seen by business and diplomatic communities as its strong remaining asset amid encroachments from Beijing.

Hong Kong has been governed under a “one country, two systems” formula since its return to Beijing, allowing freedoms not enjoyed on mainland China but not a fully democratic vote.

Many accuse Beijing of extensive meddling since then, including obstruction of democratic reforms, interference with elections and of being behind the disappearance of five Hong Kong-based booksellers, starting in 2015, who specialised in works critical of Chinese leaders.

Some opponents of the extradition bill said a suspension was not enough and want it scrapped and Lam to go.

“If she refuses to scrap this controversial bill altogether, it would mean we wouldn’t retreat. She stays on, we stay on,” said pro-democracy lawmaker Claudia Mo.

Asked repeatedly on Saturday if she would step down, Lam avoided answering directly and appealed to the public to “give us another chance.” Lam said she had been a civil servant for decades and still had work she wanted to do.

She added that she felt “deep sorrow and regret that the deficiencies in our work and various other factors have stirred up substantial controversies and disputes in society”.

Lam’s reversal was hailed by business groups including the American Chamber of Commerce, which had spoken out strongly against the bill, and overseas governments.

The UK Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said on Twitter: “Well done HK Government for heeding concerns of the brave citizens who have stood up for their human rights”.

China’s top newspaper on Sunday condemned “anti-China lackeys” of foreign forces in Hong Kong.

“Certain people in Hong Kong have been relying on foreigners or relying on young people to build themselves up, serving as the pawns and lackeys of foreign anti-China forces,” the ruling People’s Daily said in a commentary.

“This is resolutely opposed by the whole of the Chinese people including the vast majority of Hong Kong compatriots.”

The Hong Kong protests have been the largest in the city since crowds came out against the bloody suppression of pro-democracy demonstrations centred around Beijing’s Tiananmen Square on June 4, 1989.

Officials said 72 people were admitted to hospitals from the Wednesday protest, while a man died on Saturday after plunging from construction scaffolding where he unfurled a banner denouncing Hong Kong’s extradition bill, local media reported.

Lam had said the extradition law was necessary to prevent criminals using Hong Kong as a place to hide and that human rights would be protected by the city’s court which would decide on the extraditions on a case-by-case basis.

Critics, including leading lawyers and rights groups, note China’s justice system is controlled by the Communist Party, and say it is marked by torture and forced confessions, arbitrary detention and poor access to lawyers.

The post Thousands dressed in black rally to demand Hong Kong leader steps down appeared first on The Himalayan Times.



from World – The Himalayan Times http://bit.ly/2FdrkGn

Saturday, June 15, 2019

June 15, 2019

Ugandan medics now tackling Ebola say they lack supplies

BWERA, UGANDA: The isolation ward for Ebola patients is a tent erected in the garden of the local hospital. Gloves are given out sparingly to health workers. And when the second person in this Uganda border town died after the virus outbreak spread from neighbouring Congo, the hospital for several hours couldn’t find a vehicle to take away the body.

A health worker puts on her protective clothing before vaccinating people against Ebola at the hospital in the village of Kagando, near the border with Congo, in western Uganda Saturday, June 15, 2019. Photo: AP

“We don’t really have an isolation ward,” the Bwera Hospital’s administrator, Pedson Buthalha, told The Associated Press. “It’s just a tent. To be honest, we can’t accommodate more than five people.”

While Ugandan authorities praise the health workers as “heroes” and say they are prepared to contain the virus, some workers disagree, wondering where the millions of dollars spent on preparing for Ebola have gone if a hospital on the front line lacks basic supplies.

“Even the gloves are not enough,” the hospital administrator said Thursday. “I give them out small.” A nurse nodded in agreement.

The World Health Organization on Friday said the Ebola outbreak is an “extraordinary event” of deep concern but does not yet merit being declared a global emergency. Such a declaration typically triggers more funding, resources and political attention. WHO said $54 million is needed to stop the outbreak.

And yet both Congo and Uganda appeared to lobby against a declaration, with Congo counting the Uganda-related Ebola cases as its own, saying Congo was where the family members began developing symptoms. Ugandan authorities on Friday said they had only one suspected Ebola case remaining in the country.

More than 1,400 people have died since this outbreak was declared in August in eastern Congo, one of the world’s most turbulent regions, where rebel attacks and community resistance have hurt Ebola response work. The virus can spread quickly via close contact with bodily fluids of those infected and can be fatal in up to 90% of cases, and identifying people who might have been exposed is crucial.

While Ugandan health workers aren’t facing the violent attacks that have killed several Ebola responders in Congo, they remain at risk as they seek to isolate, test and treat for the virus. Basic equipment such as gloves is essential.

A nurse, who spoke on condition of anonymity to avoid possible retribution, questioned why some people who might have been exposed to Ebola are allowed to stay at home.

“I wish we could coordinate,” the hospital administrator said of the apparent confusion over how to manage the outbreak.

Ugandan Health Minister Jane Aceng told the AP on Saturday that district officials in Kasese were to blame for limited medical supplies after delaying in submitting their budget.

“It is clearly the responsibility of the district to order supplies,” she said. “If they haven’t done the orders we can’t supply because we don’t know how much they need.” As for upgrading the makeshift isolation ward in the hospital garden, she said “it is not economical. It is not cost-effective” to build permanent structures.

Uganda has faced multiple Ebola outbreaks and is a regional leader in battling Ebola, even if this part of the country has never experienced an outbreak. Some Ugandan physicians were deployed to the West African outbreak of 2013-2016, the deadliest in history.

Health workers in this outbreak now have the benefit of an experimental but effective Ebola vaccine that is being widely used, with more than 130,000 doses distributed. Uganda has vaccinated nearly 4,700 health workers, with more vaccinations beginning on Saturday.

Still, corruption is rampant, and many local people are scornful of government officials seen as out of touch.

As Bwera Hospital tried to arrange a safe burial on Thursday for one of Uganda’s first Ebola victims, officials quickly realized there was no vehicle. The burial took place hours later and in darkness , which some residents called a sign of the government’s shortcomings.

“This should have been done by the health office, the district health office,” said Moses Mugisa, clerk of the border town of Mpondwe-Lhubiriha, who eventually found transport for the corpse.

In addition, he said, voluntary health teams screening for Ebola on the border have gone unpaid for about four months. He criticized the decision of government officials from Kampala, the capital, to visit only briefly after Uganda’s first Ebola case was announced.

“We have a lot of work to do,” he said.

The post Ugandan medics now tackling Ebola say they lack supplies appeared first on The Himalayan Times.



from Health – The Himalayan Times http://bit.ly/2Ki2AkJ
June 15, 2019

Ugandan medics now tackling Ebola say they lack supplies

BWERA, UGANDA: The isolation ward for Ebola patients is a tent erected in the garden of the local hospital. Gloves are given out sparingly to health workers. And when the second person in this Uganda border town died after the virus outbreak spread from neighbouring Congo, the hospital for several hours couldn’t find a vehicle to take away the body.

A health worker puts on her protective clothing before vaccinating people against Ebola at the hospital in the village of Kagando, near the border with Congo, in western Uganda Saturday, June 15, 2019. Photo: AP

“We don’t really have an isolation ward,” the Bwera Hospital’s administrator, Pedson Buthalha, told The Associated Press. “It’s just a tent. To be honest, we can’t accommodate more than five people.”

While Ugandan authorities praise the health workers as “heroes” and say they are prepared to contain the virus, some workers disagree, wondering where the millions of dollars spent on preparing for Ebola have gone if a hospital on the front line lacks basic supplies.

“Even the gloves are not enough,” the hospital administrator said Thursday. “I give them out small.” A nurse nodded in agreement.

The World Health Organization on Friday said the Ebola outbreak is an “extraordinary event” of deep concern but does not yet merit being declared a global emergency. Such a declaration typically triggers more funding, resources and political attention. WHO said $54 million is needed to stop the outbreak.

And yet both Congo and Uganda appeared to lobby against a declaration, with Congo counting the Uganda-related Ebola cases as its own, saying Congo was where the family members began developing symptoms. Ugandan authorities on Friday said they had only one suspected Ebola case remaining in the country.

More than 1,400 people have died since this outbreak was declared in August in eastern Congo, one of the world’s most turbulent regions, where rebel attacks and community resistance have hurt Ebola response work. The virus can spread quickly via close contact with bodily fluids of those infected and can be fatal in up to 90% of cases, and identifying people who might have been exposed is crucial.

While Ugandan health workers aren’t facing the violent attacks that have killed several Ebola responders in Congo, they remain at risk as they seek to isolate, test and treat for the virus. Basic equipment such as gloves is essential.

A nurse, who spoke on condition of anonymity to avoid possible retribution, questioned why some people who might have been exposed to Ebola are allowed to stay at home.

“I wish we could coordinate,” the hospital administrator said of the apparent confusion over how to manage the outbreak.

Ugandan Health Minister Jane Aceng told the AP on Saturday that district officials in Kasese were to blame for limited medical supplies after delaying in submitting their budget.

“It is clearly the responsibility of the district to order supplies,” she said. “If they haven’t done the orders we can’t supply because we don’t know how much they need.” As for upgrading the makeshift isolation ward in the hospital garden, she said “it is not economical. It is not cost-effective” to build permanent structures.

Uganda has faced multiple Ebola outbreaks and is a regional leader in battling Ebola, even if this part of the country has never experienced an outbreak. Some Ugandan physicians were deployed to the West African outbreak of 2013-2016, the deadliest in history.

Health workers in this outbreak now have the benefit of an experimental but effective Ebola vaccine that is being widely used, with more than 130,000 doses distributed. Uganda has vaccinated nearly 4,700 health workers, with more vaccinations beginning on Saturday.

Still, corruption is rampant, and many local people are scornful of government officials seen as out of touch.

As Bwera Hospital tried to arrange a safe burial on Thursday for one of Uganda’s first Ebola victims, officials quickly realized there was no vehicle. The burial took place hours later and in darkness , which some residents called a sign of the government’s shortcomings.

“This should have been done by the health office, the district health office,” said Moses Mugisa, clerk of the border town of Mpondwe-Lhubiriha, who eventually found transport for the corpse.

In addition, he said, voluntary health teams screening for Ebola on the border have gone unpaid for about four months. He criticized the decision of government officials from Kampala, the capital, to visit only briefly after Uganda’s first Ebola case was announced.

“We have a lot of work to do,” he said.

The post Ugandan medics now tackling Ebola say they lack supplies appeared first on The Himalayan Times.



from Lifestyle – The Himalayan Times http://bit.ly/2Ki2AkJ
via IFTTT
June 15, 2019

India clash is ‘must-win’ for Pakistan, says Gavaskar

Pakistan will be the team under pressure in Sunday’s World Cup clash against arch-rivals India and will face a mammoth task to reach the semi-finals if they lose, according to former Indian batsman Sunil Gavaskar.

Pakistan have lost two of their four games and are eighth in the tournament standings. Their only win came against hosts England and their match against Sri Lanka was washed out.

“It’s a must-win game for them,” Gavaskar told the World Cup website. “If they don’t win tomorrow, it’ll be very tough.

“The fact it’s an old rivalry means it will be followed closely by the people of both countries, but Pakistan have had a bit of a stumble so far so there’s probably a bit more pressure on them.”

With the threat of rain looming large over Sunday’s match in Manchester, Gavaskar said India will start as favourites to extend their six-match winning streak over Pakistan at 50-overs World Cups.

“If it’s a proper 50-overs game I think India have the strength to win,” he added.

“But if gets truncated, if it’s a game that gets reduced to 30 overs or less, anything can happen.”

The post India clash is ‘must-win’ for Pakistan, says Gavaskar appeared first on The Himalayan Times.



from Sports – The Himalayan Times http://bit.ly/2KSumn7